1

Say I would like to ask a question about black's options after

  1. e4 e5
  2. f4

I would tag my question as "king's gambit" (perhaps with other tags, depending on the question itself).

On the other hand, if I would like to ask the same question after

  1. f4 e5
  2. e4

I would still tag my question as "king's gambit", but I would also use the tag "bird's opening". The questions are essentially the same, the only difference is in move order. Furthermore, if I would like to attract attention from those users who are interested in bird's opening, I may even purposefully use this order and thus the tag "bird's opening" for the same queston. (Is it proper to do so?)

Another example, for

  1. d4 d5
  2. c4

I would tag "queen's gambit"; on the other hand, for

  1. c4 d5
  2. d4

I will also tag "english opening".

So should different tags be used for the same question if the move order is presented slightly differently?

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4

In general to decide on the name of the opening used, you start at the end of the game and then work backwards; the first position with a well-recognized name is the one you use.

So unless your question is specifically about the move order 1.f4 e5 2.e4, that position is a King's Gambit and not a Bird Opening or From Gambit.

So no, the move order is irrelevant for what opening it is and should have no effect on the chosen tag.

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  • Thanks! Then the name From's Gambit will cease to exist as the position is always named King's Gambit. – Zuriel Feb 11 '19 at 13:26
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    @Zuriel: No, 1.f4 e5 2.fxe5 d6 is still the normal From Gambit. – RemcoGerlich Feb 11 '19 at 13:40
  • This is not an answer. – Jossie Calderon May 8 '19 at 4:16
  • 2
    @JossieCalderon: the answer is basically No, added a line. – RemcoGerlich May 8 '19 at 7:50
2

Essentially such a question would be about a certain position, which can be reached as a variation of multiple different openings. In such a case I see no harm in tagging it with more than one relevant opening tag.

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